Notice of Meeting

 

 

 

 

 

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Water, Waste and Sewer Advisory Committee Meeting

 

 

A Water, Waste and Sewer Advisory Committee Meeting of Byron Shire Council will be held as follows:

 

Venue

Conference Room, Station Street, Mullumbimby

Date

Thursday, 14 September 2017

Time

11.30am

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phil Holloway

Director Infrastructure Services                                                                                         I2017/1293

                                                                                                                                    Distributed 07/09/17

 

 


CONFLICT OF INTERESTS

What is a “Conflict of Interests” - A conflict of interests can be of two types:

Pecuniary - an interest that a person has in a matter because of a reasonable likelihood or expectation of appreciable financial gain or loss to the person or another person with whom the person is associated.

Non-pecuniary – a private or personal interest that a Council official has that does not amount to a pecuniary interest as defined in the Local Government Act (eg. A friendship, membership of an association, society or trade union or involvement or interest in an activity and may include an interest of a financial nature).

Remoteness – a person does not have a pecuniary interest in a matter if the interest is so remote or insignificant that it could not reasonably be regarded as likely to influence any decision the person might make in relation to a matter or if the interest is of a kind specified in Section 448 of the Local Government Act.

Who has a Pecuniary Interest? - a person has a pecuniary interest in a matter if the pecuniary interest is the interest of the person, or another person with whom the person is associated (see below).

Relatives, Partners - a person is taken to have a pecuniary interest in a matter if:

§  The person’s spouse or de facto partner or a relative of the person has a pecuniary interest in the matter, or

§  The person, or a nominee, partners or employer of the person, is a member of a company or other body that has a pecuniary interest in the matter.

N.B. “Relative”, in relation to a person means any of the following:

(a)   the parent, grandparent, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, nephew, niece, lineal descends or adopted child of the person or of the person’s spouse;

(b)   the spouse or de facto partners of the person or of a person referred to in paragraph (a)

No Interest in the Matter - however, a person is not taken to have a pecuniary interest in a matter:

§  If the person is unaware of the relevant pecuniary interest of the spouse, de facto partner, relative or company or other body, or

§  Just because the person is a member of, or is employed by, the Council.

§  Just because the person is a member of, or a delegate of the Council to, a company or other body that has a pecuniary interest in the matter provided that the person has no beneficial interest in any shares of the company or body.

Disclosure and participation in meetings

§  A Councillor or a member of a Council Committee who has a pecuniary interest in any matter with which the Council is concerned and who is present at a meeting of the Council or Committee at which the matter is being considered must disclose the nature of the interest to the meeting as soon as practicable.

§  The Councillor or member must not be present at, or in sight of, the meeting of the Council or Committee:

(a)   at any time during which the matter is being considered or discussed by the Council or Committee, or

(b)   at any time during which the Council or Committee is voting on any question in relation to  the matter.

No Knowledge - a person does not breach this Clause if the person did not know and could not reasonably be expected to have known that the matter under consideration at the meeting was a matter in which he or she had a pecuniary interest.

Participation in Meetings Despite Pecuniary Interest (S 452 Act)

A Councillor is not prevented from taking part in the consideration or discussion of, or from voting on, any of the matters/questions detailed in Section 452 of the Local Government Act.

Non-pecuniary Interests - Must be disclosed in meetings.

There are a broad range of options available for managing conflicts & the option chosen will depend on an assessment of the circumstances of the matter, the nature of the interest and the significance of the issue being dealt with.  Non-pecuniary conflicts of interests must be dealt with in at least one of the following ways:

§  It may be appropriate that no action be taken where the potential for conflict is minimal.  However, Councillors should consider providing an explanation of why they consider a conflict does not exist.

§  Limit involvement if practical (eg. Participate in discussion but not in decision making or vice-versa).  Care needs to be taken when exercising this option.

§  Remove the source of the conflict (eg. Relinquishing or divesting the personal interest that creates the conflict)

§  Have no involvement by absenting yourself from and not taking part in any debate or voting on the issue as if the provisions in S451 of the Local Government Act apply (particularly if you have a significant non-pecuniary interest)

RECORDING OF VOTING ON PLANNING MATTERS

Clause 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 – Recording of voting on planning matters

(1)   In this section, planning decision means a decision made in the exercise of a function of a council under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979:

(a)   including a decision relating to a development application, an environmental planning instrument, a development control plan or a development contribution plan under that Act, but

(b)   not including the making of an order under Division 2A of Part 6 of that Act.

(2)   The general manager is required to keep a register containing, for each planning decision made at a meeting of the council or a council committee, the names of the councillors who supported the decision and the names of any councillors who opposed (or are taken to have opposed) the decision.

(3)   For the purpose of maintaining the register, a division is required to be called whenever a motion for a planning decision is put at a meeting of the council or a council committee.

(4)   Each decision recorded in the register is to be described in the register or identified in a manner that enables the description to be obtained from another publicly available document, and is to include the information required by the regulations.

(5)   This section extends to a meeting that is closed to the public.

 


BYRON SHIRE COUNCIL

Water, Waste and Sewer Advisory Committee Meeting

 

 

BUSINESS OF MEETING

 

1.    Apologies

2.    Declarations of Interest – Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary

3.    Adoption of Minutes from Previous Meetings

3.1       Water, Waste and Sewer Advisory Committee Meeting held on 1 June 2017

4.    Staff Reports

Infrastructure Services

4.1       Water and Sewer Strategic Business Plan....................................................................... 4

4.2       Urban Recycled Water Commercial Connections Policy.............................................. 18

4.3       Water and Sewer Equivalent Tenement Policy Review................................................. 27

4.4       State Government Water and Sewerage Performance Reports................................... 55

4.5       Byron Shire Effluent Management Strategy (Draft)....................................................... 69

4.6       Update on the Container Deposit Legislation.................................................................. 92

4.7       Vallances Road Plan of Management............................................................................ 95

4.8       Update on the review of Council's Integrated Waste Management and Resource Recovery Strategy....................................................................................................................................... 152

4.9       Response to Alan Dickens Questions........................................................................... 159

4.10     Items For the Committee Requested by Duncan Dey................................................. 187   

 

 


BYRON SHIRE COUNCIL

Staff Reports - Infrastructure Services                                                                   4.1

 

 

Staff Reports - Infrastructure Services

 

Report No. 4.1             Water and Sewer Strategic Business Plan

Directorate:                 Infrastructure Services

Report Author:           Peter Rees, Manager Utilities

File No:                        I2017/679

Theme:                         Community Infrastructure

                                      Sewerage Services

 

 

Summary:

 

At the Committee’s meeting held 2 March 2017, a presentation was provided regarding the Water and Sewer Strategic Business Plan.  The presentation is now presented to the Committee again to allow recommendation to Council.  The cost increases as a result of the resolution are generally as detailed below:-

 

·     Sewerage:

Mullumbimby inflow and infiltration reduction: $500,000 p.a. for ten years (then $100,000 p.a.)

Inflow and infiltration investigations for other systems: $500,000 p.a. for ten years (then $100,000 p.a.)

Effluent reuse opportunities: $10.0 million over the next ten years

EDC testing program: $200,000

Energy efficiency projects: $0.5 million over the next ten years (half for each of water supply and sewerage)

·     Water supply:

Mullumbimby water supply security: $5 million

Energy efficiency projects: $0.5 million over the next ten years (half for each of water supply and sewerage).

The financial plans have modeled this additional expenditure and it is affordable with the sewer and water funds continuing to accumulate significant levels of cash over the longer term as a result of the operational efficiencies gained over the past decade.

  

 

RECOMMENDATION:

That the Water Waste and Sewer Advisory Committee note the report.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Report

 

Council via the Water Waste and Sewer Committee adopted the following resolution below for the draft 2016 Water Supply and Sewerage Strategic Business Plan.

 

Report No. 4.3     Water and Sewer Strategic Business Plan Workshop

File No: I2017/246

Committee Recommendation 4.3.1

That at the next meeting of the Water, Waste and Sewer Committee the following expenditure items be considered for addition to a revised Water and Sewer Strategic Business Plan:

 

1.    Overcome fundamental problems in the sewer connections and lines in Mullumbimby, Brunswick Heads and Byron Bay

2.    Make reuse (e.g. agricultural irrigation) the primary means of disposal ahead of discharge to waterways

3.    Bring in full-spectrum testing and treatment (including alkyl-phenols) of sewage

4.    Consider minimising energy usage and the use of renewable energy (Lyon/Richardson)

 

The motion was put to the vote and declared carried.

 

Following the preparation of the draft SBP in 2016, Council is currently preparing a review of its water supply and sewerage strategic planning.  This review aligns with the NSW Government’s water utility best-practice requirements for a mid-term review of the Integrated Water Cycle Management (IWCM) Strategy.  The new strategic plan considers the existing IWCM Strategy (adopted in 2009), the draft SBP and other key planning documents such as Council’s financial plan, asset management planning and development servicing plans and other strategic planning investigations including sewerage system investigations, effluent reuse planning, inflow/infiltration reduction and drinking water management planning undertaken since 2009.  The strategic plan is expected to be available for Committee review in September 2017.

 

The mid-term IWCM review will provide:

 

·   A discussion of the status of issues identified in the IWCM Strategy Plan;

·   The status of the adopted IWCM Strategy actions;

·   Water supply and sewerage growth forecasts;

·   Analysis of water supply demand (current and future);

·   Analysis of sewerage system flows and sewage treatment plant performance; and

·   Comparison of the performance of Council’s water supply and sewerage schemes with other local water utilities and identification of potential areas for improvement.

The review addresses the water supply and sewerage management issues identified in the 2009 IWCM Strategy that require ongoing effort, as follows:

 

·   Inflow and infiltration into the sewerage systems, particularly in Mullumbimby;

·   Impacts of treated sewage discharge on receiving waterways and additional opportunities for effluent reuse; and

·   Long-term security of Mullumbimby water supply.

The review has also documented issues that have arisen since the 2009 IWCM Strategy and will be investigated and addressed in Council’s future strategic planning:

 

·   Ocean Shores STP capacity;

·   Mullumbimby water supply drought management; and

·   Climate change adaptation.

The potential options and recommended approach to addressing these issues will be documented in the review.

 

In response to the Council resolution, additional information is provided for each item in the following sections.

 

1.       Overcome fundamental problems in the sewer connections and lines in Mullumbimby, Brunswick Heads and Byron Bay

 

Mullumbimby

The Mullumbimby sewerage system (and Brunswick Valley STP) has historically experienced very high flows during dry and wet weather. In 2007 (in response to a licence pollution reduction program, PRP 1) Council developed and adopted the Mullumbimby Sewerage System Inflow and Infiltration Program Integrated Strategy which focused on the following areas:

 

·   Data collection and analysis;

·   Public sewerage infrastructure rehabilitation;

·   Private sewerage infrastructure repairs;

·   Stormwater system maintenance;

·   Public education; and

·   Pump station analysis and upgrade.

In total, $1,408,870 was spent over three years.  The project has had the following positive impacts:

 

·   A reduction in overflow occasions by 15%.

·   A reduction in overflow volume by 39%.

The project has also demonstrated that the defects in the system are generally in the sideline connections to the properties and the property’s drainage infrastructure, rather than the public sewerage mains.

 

Prior to the implementation of the Brunswick Area sewerage scheme, the sewerage system overflowed for all rainfall events above the 1 in 2 year event (50 mm in 1 hour).  The sewerage system now has the capacity to transfer flows to the Brunswick Valley STP for all rainfall events at least up to the 1 in 20 year average return interval (ARI).

 

Preliminary treatment of flows up to 7 times average dry weather flow (ADWF), secondary treatment of flows up to 5.8 times ADWF and tertiary treatment up to 3 times ADWF is provided at the Brunswick Valley STP.  However, wet weather flows up to 15 times ADWF have been recorded at the STP.

 

Council is continuing to liaise with NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) regarding compliance with licence conditions.  The EPA has not raised any concerns regarding compliance with the Brunswick Heads environment protection licence since the completion of PRP 1 in 2010.

Additional options to address high flows into the Mullumbimby sewerage system are discussed in the following table.

Table 1: Options to address high flows in Mullumbimby sewerage system

Option

Discussion

Recommendation

1. Do nothing

The cost of sewage pumping and treatment is increased with higher flows. Rainfall events greater than 50mm in 1 hour will result in sewerage system overflows to the Brunswick River (although diluted by the rainfall).  High flows will also bypass the Brunswick Valley STP treatment units and overflow directly to the Brunswick River.

The Brunswick estuary has a unique ecological value as it supports a high biological diversity including several flora and fauna species identified as threatened or endangered.  The estuary and surrounding catchments also supports several significant and important vegetation community assemblages such as wetlands, littoral rainforest and coastal saltmarsh.  The Brunswick estuary (to its tidal limits) is within the Cape Byron Marine Park, and is formally recognised as being significant in a local and regional sense, with regard to conservation values.

There is a risk that untreated sewage will discharge to the Brunswick River and adversely impact the aquatic environment through high nutrient loads.  The potential volume of untreated sewage from sewerage system overflows and STP bypasses is considered to be unacceptable over the long-term.  Additional action is therefore recommended to address the high wet weather flows.

2. Reduce illegal (private) connections into the sewerage system

The Integrated Strategy involved inspection of property connections with 61% found to have a defect.  Private sewerage infrastructure can contribute 60% of stormwater inflow and infiltration in the sewerage system.

Completion of residual corrective works to private sewers and ongoing inspection is recommended to ensure the level of stormwater ingress is progressively decreased.

The Integrated Strategy included education to increase understanding of the relationship between ineffective stormwater drains that increase the level of the water table and ultimately increase the amount of stormwater ingress into the sewerage system.

Ongoing education is also recommended.

 

3. Sewerage system upgrades to reduce stormwater inflow into the sewerage system

Work on the public sewerage system as part of the Integrated Strategy included upgrades to the reticulation system in pumping station catchments 4001, 4002 and 4003a and 4003b.

There has been no evidence found that the sewer mains and pipe joints are a systemic cause of stormwater inflow.  The defects in the public infrastructure are generally located in the sideline connections to the properties. An area of particular weakness has been found to be the connections of these sidelines to the mains.

There are minimal data on the extent of groundwater infiltration apart from recorded high dry weather flows.

Stormwater system maintenance has contributed to a reduction in localised flooding which prevents stormwater ingress into the sewerage system.

The condition of the sewerage system is dynamic. Defects that result in stormwater ingress can emerge due to deterioration and private connection works.

Ongoing public and private sewer inspection, maintenance and/or renewal is recommended as part of Council’s asset management planning to ensure the level of stormwater and groundwater ingress is progressively decreased.

Ongoing analysis of flow data, identification and repair of defects in the existing gravity system and provision of adequate storage for peak wet weather flows is also recommended.

4. Modify the system technology to reduce sewage flows

A low pressure pump system (LPPS, retrofitting low-pressure pump units and associated pipework in place of the current gravity sewer system) was considered as an alternative sewerage system technology/ configuration as part of the Mullumbimby Sewerage System Inflow and Infiltration Program Integrated Strategy.

A pump system is able to transfer more stormwater inflow off the site and into the public sewerage system than a gravity sewer system. Therefore, unless all the house drainage systems upstream of the pump unit are free of defects, installation of LPPS units in Mullumbimby could increase the amount of stormwater entering the system in the short to medium term. With any LPPS project it would be necessary to continue with the identification and repair of private property drainage defects and this would need to continue for many years to keep the system under control.

The retrofitting of a LPPS to the Mullumbimby sewerage reticulation system would have a high capital cost and will not eliminate stormwater inflow and infiltration because defects in the upstream private sewers will continue to be a problem and source of stormwater ingress. For these reasons and given the limited capacity of the sewerage system, implementation of a LPPS is not recommended.

5. Upgrade Brunswick Valley STP to treat additional wet weather flows

Additional storage at the Brunswick Valley STP can increase the volume of sewage treated by reducing STP bypasses to the river. The original scheme included additional emergency storage and constructed wetlands with a combined storage capacity of 135 ML. The proposed effluent storage dam was to be used to store treated effluent in the dry months for use in reuse schemes and lowered/emptied in the wet months to capture excess storm flows which could then be recycled through the plant for treatment. The proposed wetlands would further treat the flows that bypass the STP.

While other options for upgrade of the STP are possible, the effluent storage dam and the wetlands were part of the original approved project scope and are already partially designed. They were excluded from the project scope due to financial constraints.

The proposed transfer of Ocean Shores sewage to Brunswick Valley STP requires additional storage at the STP and a constructed wetland was also recommended in the design of the transfer to provide an environmental ‘buffer’ for effluent polishing. Regardless of the timing of the transfer of Ocean Shores sewage to Brunswick Valley STP, it is recommended that the effluent storage dam and the wetlands are constructed at Brunswick Valley STP as soon as possible.

 

The recommended actions for reducing inflow/infiltration in Mullumbimby sewerage system are:

 

·   Completion of residual corrective works and ongoing inspection of private sewers;

·   Community education;

·   Ongoing public and private sewer inspection and maintenance/renewal;

·   Ongoing analysis of flow data, identification and repair of defects in the existing gravity system and provision of adequate storage for peak wet weather flows; and

·   Construction of effluent storage dam and wetlands at Brunswick Valley STP – capital works funding was included in the financial planning undertaken for the SBP.

Funding of these actions will require additional expenditure of approximately $500,000 p.a. for ten years.

 

Other sewerage systems

Historical data on STP inflows suggest that groundwater and stormwater inflow and infiltration may also be high in Byron Bay, Bangalow and Ocean Shores sewerage systems however there have been no detailed investigations or data analysis undertaken to date.  There is no data to suggest that sewerage system overflows are a concern in these systems.

 

It is recommended that a data collection and analysis program (including monitoring of sub-catchment flows and upgrade of metering and SCADA reporting) is implemented to enable development of a priority inflow and infiltration reduction program where required.  Rectification actions recommended from the program would also achieve the aims of reduced energy consumption.  Additional expenditure of approximately $500,000 p.a. for ten years will be required to implement this action.

 

2.       Make reuse (e.g. agricultural irrigation) the primary means of disposal ahead of discharge to waterways

 

The draft Byron Shire Effluent Management Strategy (2017-2027) has been prepared to establish the path for effluent management in the Byron Shire over the next ten years. The strategic vision is that sewage will be managed in an ecologically sustainable way that has no adverse impact on the natural environment, protects public health, achieves maximum resource recovery and meets the needs and expectations of existing and future communities. The Strategy is attached and summarised below.

 

Council’s experience in operating effluent management schemes since 1999 has provided valuable insight into the future directions of effluent management in Byron Shire. In the absence of high water using industries and in an area that receives sufficient rainfall, Council has been challenged to find ways to significantly increase levels of effluent reuse. Over the next ten years Council will focus on effluent management projects that maximise effluent application.

 

It is proposed wetlands and environmental schemes will form the key direction in effluent management for the future.  These applications provide Council with the ability to proactively manage effluent reuse to provide long-term demand security. The successful implementation of the Byron Bay Integrated Water Management Reserve in achieving not only high levels of effluent reuse through evapotranspiration and seepage but also in the environmental remediation of localised acid sulphate soil and habitat loss, has influenced Council’s key direction.

 

Not only do wetlands and environmental projects have the lowest level of risks and offer the highest levels of security for long term use, this reuse application is capable of using the volumes of effluent required to achieve the community objectives.  High volumes of effluent would be taken up through evapo-transpiration by well-planned wetlands of sufficient area with suitable species for the local hydrology.

.

Council has also commenced investigations into other viable Council controlled land applications that have the potential to achieve high levels of effluent reuse. The Biomass Hub project has provided Council with a unique opportunity for maximising the evapotranspiration of effluent. The prospect of using the effluent for the irrigation of a biomass crop to be harvested for bioenergy production is emerging as one of the preferred effluent management strategies. According to the Zero Emissions Byron report, bioenergy could provide for 28 % of the Shire’s electricity needs. This project provides Council with an opportunity to showcase sustainability and significantly contribute to its zero emissions target.

 

The Byron Bay Urban Recycled Water Scheme will continue to be developed to full capacity. All sporting fields and nurseries along the Urban Corridor use recycled water for irrigation purposes and recently the scheme has been extended to include flushing of public toilets with the local hotels and caravan parks expected to connect in the near future. An upgrade to the system will be considered based on demand, although it is considered growth will be small and incremental. Urban schemes are not considered viable for the smaller villages including Brunswick Valley, Bangalow or Ocean Shores and will not be pursued.

 

The Council operated rural scheme, Main Arm Recycled Water Scheme, has been the least successful effluent management application with the scheme failing to meet community aspirations. In theory, rural reuse projects are able to utilise high volumes of effluent, however the uncertainty with the operation of rural schemes due to external limitations such as high rainfall and the business drivers of private landowners increases the risks associated with the development of rural schemes.

 

Previous reliance on small businesses and farming enterprises has not provided the long-term demand for recycled water that the Byron community desires. To maximise the opportunities for agricultural reuse, Council will continue to investigate rural reuse in the Byron Bay Scheme and will support farming enterprises in suitable locations.

The proposed strategy for effluent reuse over the next ten years is shown in Table 2. Further investigations including land acquisition and concept development of the schemes are required to be undertaken. Cost estimates have not yet been developed although a budget estimate of $10.0 million has been assumed for the next ten years.

Table 2: Key directions for effluent reuse over the next ten years

Existing Scheme

Current Reuse (average %  of STP inflow)

Proposed Scheme Development

2027 Targets

Byron Bay

·  Urban reuse – dual reticulation for toilet flushing and open space irrigation

·  Integrated Water Management Reserve – constructed and natural wetland regeneration

·   270 ML/, 15% (urban)

·   400 ML/a, 23% (wetlands)(1)

·   30 ML/a, 2% (on-site and tanker transfer):

Total: 700 ML/a (38%)

·   Expansion of urban reuse scheme to full capacity

·   Expansion of constructed wetlands within Belongil Creek catchment

·   New rural scheme (western corridor)

·  Urban: 330 ML/a

·  Additional 20ha (200 ML/a) wetland by 2019.

·  Future 60ha (600 ML/a) to be identified.

·  Rural (Western Corridor) (250 ML/a)

Total: 1,800 ML/a (81%)(1)

Brunswick Valley

·  Main Arm – pasture and fodder irrigation (2 farms)

·   60 ML/a, 8% (irrigation)

·   3 ML/a, 0.4% (on-site):

Total: 63 ML/a (8.4%)

·   Expansion of rural scheme

·   New wetland regeneration and biomass cropping scheme (Sustainability Reserve)

·   Ocean Shores wetlands

·  Rural expansion unknown

·  100 ML/a for wetlands

·  400 ML/a for biomass cropping

·  100 ML/a via Ocean Shores wetlands

Total: 663 ML/a (48%)(1)

 

Existing Scheme

Current Reuse (average %  of STP inflow)

Proposed Scheme Development

2027 Targets

Bangalow

·  Bamboo plantation (5.23 ha)

·   18 ML/a, 13%

·   Biomass cropping

·  Additional 15 ha (150 ML/a)(1)

Total: 168 ML/a (100%)

Ocean Shores

·  Wetlands

Not monitored

·   STP to be decommissioned.

·   Constructed wetland regeneration (treated effluent from Brunswick Valley STP to upgraded Ocean Shores wetlands)

Included above.

·  All STPs

2,630 ML/a

1. Assumed evapotranspiration through wetlands. The remainder is discharged via surface water or groundwater.

 

3.       Bring in full-spectrum testing and treatment (including alkyl-phenols) of sewage

 

Currently sewage is monitored for treatment plant operational control as well as discharge compliance testing in accordance with EPA licences. Parameters currently tested by Council include biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, faecal coliforms, nitrogen, phosphorous, pH, solids, chlorine, alkalinity, conductivity and sulfide.

 

Alkyl-phenols can imitate the action of natural estrogens and are an example of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) which are natural or synthetic chemicals that interact with the endocrine system altering its normal functioning.  Common examples are nonylphenols found in surfactants, detergents, cosmetics and spermicides that can be present in STP effluent and other point sources.  It has been assumed that EDCs are the focus of this part of the Council resolution.  Background information on EDCs and their potential presence in municipal sewage and treated effluent discharges is provided below.

 

There are three broad categories of EDCs:

 

·   Natural compounds such as estrogens, androgens, and plant-derived phytoestrogens;

·   Synthetic steroidal hormones designed to target the endocrine system such as 17-alpha ethinylestradiol (the contraceptive pill)and other pharmaceutical products; and

·   Synthetic chemicals (xenoestrogens), representing a diverse range of compounds including  pesticides, dioxins, Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) , Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenols and several heavy metals.  These compounds differ from natural and synthetic hormones as they were never intended to produce estrogenic effects in organisms.

The endocrine system in living organisms regulates the production of hormones responsible for controlling a number of important bodily functions including metabolism, reproduction and tissue function.  EDCs can be released from a range of point sources including STPs, pulp and paper mills, intensive animal operations (feedlots, piggeries etc.) and industrial sites as well as diffuse sources such as landfill leachate and agricultural runoff from land treated with pesticides.

 

STPs are known as sources of EDC compounds, particularly natural and steroidal hormones that are passed from humans to wastewater. Australian guidelines for managing risks in recycled water include EDCs as an emerging hazard found in sewage for which there is insufficient toxicological information. 

 

The National Guidelines for Water Recycling state that EDCs have been shown to affect aquatic biota but there is no evidence that environmental exposure to low levels of potential EDCs affects human health. The World Health Organisation has published the latest research on EDCs including a summary for decision makers (http://www.who.int/ceh/risks/cehemerging2/en/).

 

It has been shown in Australian studies (e.g. Williams et al., 2007) that the technology used at STPs has an influence on the concentrations of EDCs in the effluent discharged. The available literature suggests that tertiary treatment is the most effective in the removal of xenoestrogens and treatment with aerobic processes was more effective than systems with anaerobic processes. Conventional coagulation/sedimentation/filtration processes are capable of removing large percentages of some compounds. Bioreactors, UV disinfection and oxidation ditches also have reasonable removal rates. The removal of steroidal estrogen is significantly lower than xenoestrogen removal with any treatment technology employed.

 

West Byron and Brunswick Valley STPs utilise oxidation and aerobic secondary treatment with UV disinfection. Effluent reused for urban applications from Byron Bay is also disinfected with chlorine and filtered. Effluent reused for agricultural applications (Main Arm) is also disinfected with chlorine. Bangalow STP is a membrane bioreactor (MBR) plant. Ocean Shores STP is an intermittently decanted extended aeration plant (biological treatment) with wetland polishing and UV disinfection.

 

A 2008 investigation of EDCs in Evans Head STP effluent (Hydrosphere Consulting, 2008) found that there were very low levels of estrogenicity in the STP effluent and the receiving environment and that it was highly unlikely that EDCs were leading to adverse biological effects in organisms living in the receiving environment.

 

Another 2008 study (Coleman et al.) to determine the estrogenic and androgenic activities of raw and treated sewage from STPs run by MidCoast Water measured estrogenic and androgenic activities. Secondary treatment (using activated sludge) removed the majority of the estrogenic (female sex hormones) and androgenic (male hormonal characteristics) activity (up to 99%).

 

Tertiary treatment by UV disinfection removed varying levels of estrogenic (19-69%) and androgenic (5-55%) activities. An MBR STP also utilising electro-chlorination removed over 87% of the estrogenic activity and over 98% of androgenic activity from raw sewage samples. However, levels which could be biologically significant still remained after secondary and tertiary treatment. On the basis of the available research, it is expected that Byron Shire’s STPs would provide some removal of EDCs.

 

The current methods for detecting EDCs are:

 

·   Biological testing, using biomarkers and bioassays - A number of screening techniques have been developed to screen for estrogenic activity. Some of the more commonly used screening assays are the reporter gene assays such as the yeast estrogen screen (YES, a yeast screen bioassay was employed in the MidCoast Water study), the estrogen responsive chemically activated luciferase reporter gene expression (ER-CALUX®) assays (employed in the Evans Head study) and the GeneBLAzer battery of tests;

·   Chemical analysis of raw water samples to screen for selected EDC compounds - Field-based EDC monitoring programs are generally based on the collection of discrete water samples, which are often repeated over space and time to account for system variability (e.g. monthly). There are a number of limitations in such an approach based on chemical analysis of water samples including cost and time requirements, lack of availability of suitable analytical methods for compounds such as hormones and pharmaceutical products, the estrogenic potency of EDC mixtures which is not detected by discrete EDC testing and the biodegradation of samples; and

·   Whole fish studies - Chemical analyses may detect chemicals that have the potential to affect the endocrine systems of organisms but do not determine if detected chemicals are having an impact on the system, or the nature of impacts.  Whole fish studies look for direct impacts in the receiving environment and take into account multiple processes occurring in the environment such as bioavailability, effects of mixtures of different EDCs on organisms and metabolism and the effects of long-term exposure.  However, whole fish studies are expensive and studies conducted in isolation will not allow for any effects to be isolated from effects due to other factors.

The recommended initial aim of any EDC testing program is to assess the potential estrogenicity of water and sediment samples to give an indication of the risk of EDCs to the environment. The use of bioassays offers a relatively simple, standardised and cost-effective methodology to assess potential estrogenicity of raw water samples.  The main advantage of this method for preliminary assessment is that rather than trying to detect the presence of possible EDCs in water samples that could involve several hundred potential chemicals that may or may not be affecting biota, the test determines whether there is potential estrogenicity in samples.

 

If required, further work could be carried out to pin-point particular chemical(s) either at the time of the initial screening tests or as a second stage in investigations.  Whole fish studies could also be undertaken to detect morphological changes to organisms in the system as a second or third stage of investigations.

 

The Environmental & Agricultural Health Team at DPI in Wollongbar has previously offered a local service to test for EDCs using NATA accredited CALUX® methods.  However, DPI funding priorities have changed and there is currently no known provider of the CALUX method in Australia.

 

The GeneBLAzer assay is run by Griffith University in the Gold Coast. Other bioassay testing methods are not readily available in Australia at the moment.  The ER-CALUX assay can be run by its developers (BioDetection Systems) in The Netherlands.

 

Analysis costs are approximately $600 per sample for each estrogenicity assay (ER-GeneBLAzer). The GeneBLAzer suite of assays can also be used to detect other endocrine endpoints such as androgenicity (AR-GeneBLAzer), glucocorticoid (GR-GeneBLAzer) and progestagenic (PR-GeneBLAzer) endpoints.  The cost for analysis of the full suite of assays would be approximately $2,000 per sample. Additional costs would apply for sample collection, transport and reporting.

Chemical analysis costs are as follows (per sample):-

 

·   Heavy metals, triazine herbicides, organochlorine pesticides (OCP), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nonyl- and octylphenol and estrogens: $600 per sample; and

·   Dioxins/furans - Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins & Polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs): $1,700 per sample.

Additional costs would apply for sample collection, transport and reporting.

 

A proposed preliminary testing program consists of water samples taken at the STP inlets, STP outlets (peak and non-peak flows), two locations downstream of STP discharge points and a location upstream of the STPs (six sites per STP).  Sediment samples could also collected at the two locations downstream of STP discharge points. Additional samples could be collected at other sites including known sources of EDCs such as solid waste facilities and agricultural areas.

 

A budget estimate for this initial testing program at each STP is (assuming 8 locations are sampled per STP, excluding GST):-

 

Sample collection (8 samples, 2 sets)

$3,000

GeneBLAzer bioassays (4)

$16,000

Chemical analysis (heavy metals, triazine herbicides, OCP, PCB, PAH, nonyl- and octylphenol and estrogens

$4,800

Chemical analysis (dioxins/furans)

$13,600

Reporting and management

$7,000

Total cost (per STP)

$44,000

Total cost (for all 4 STPs)

$177,600

 

Costs could be reduced by only conducting the GeneBLAzer bioassays or only conducting the program for a single STP.

 

4.       Consider minimising energy usage and the use of renewable energy

 

Water and sewer projects in recent years have been developed with the aim of minimising energy use e.g. tenders for Valances Road STP were evaluated against greenhouse gas generation criteria and variable speed drives and power correction factor devices were installed at SPSs and STPs where viable.  These actions were driven by the Byron Shire Low Carbon Strategy 2014.

 

Other actions proposed in the Strategy include:

 

·   Investigate additional opportunities for energy efficiency throughout the wastewater treatment network;

·   Conduct energy and water audit of Council facilities to identify efficiency improvements (e.g. lighting, insulation, tap locks, hot water);

·   Investigate feasibility of micro hydro turbines in reticulated water supply network;

·   Encourage and promote safe water harvesting and reuse for residents and businesses;

·   Install ‘smart meters’ across the water and sewerage assets to provide centralised monitoring of energy consumption; and

·   Continue to manage Council's energy and fuel data to identify wastage and document consumption.

Council is investigating the potential to utilise all sources of organic waste material, termed “biomass”, produced in the Shire. Biomass is organic matter from urban, commercial or farming activities that could be utilised for its highest available reuse value by being “fed” into a bio energy plant.  

 

Innovative utilisation of the Shire’s biomass provides an opportunity to reduce carbon emissions and creating a valuable resource from the mass of organic waste material (including STP effluent and biosolids) produced within the Shire.  Council has recently completed a detailed assessment to quantify and qualify the possible sources of biomass within the Byron Shire.

 

A budget estimate for additional expenditure on energy efficiency projects is $0.5 million over the next ten years. 

 

Financial Assessment

 

The current water supply and sewerage capital works programs consider the future growth expected within the Shire, the replacement of assets considered in poor or critical condition and the provision of works to improve the levels of service currently provided to ensure the delivery of the targets adopted by Council. The estimated capital investment over the next 30 years for water supply and sewerage documented in the draft SBP was $37 million and $102 million respectively.

 

Asset renewal projects and projected expenditure were reviewed as part of the development of the SBP and Financial Planning. Major asset upgrade projects include the proposed transfer of Ocean Shores sewage to Brunswick Valley STP for treatment and upgrade of Brunswick Valley STP (2020) and longer-term upgrade of the STP in 2032.  Expenditure for upgrade of the Byron Bay STP is included between 2024 and 2027.  Expenditure for upgrade of the Mullumbimby WTP is included in 2044.

 

Financial plans were developed with the draft 2016 SBP to enable Council to determine the revenue needed to meet the levels of service over the long term, adopt funding strategies and effectively manage the cash flow.  The financial plans included the capital works plans and recurrent costs for operations, maintenance and administration identified at that time.

 

As a result of the IWCM review, additional expenditure is proposed as follows:

 

·   Sewerage:

o Mullumbimby inflow and infiltration reduction: $500,000 p.a. for ten years (then $100,000 p.a.)

o Inflow and infiltration investigations for other systems: $500,000 p.a. for ten years (then $100,000 p.a.)

o Effluent reuse opportunities: $10.0 million over the next ten years

o EDC testing program: $200,000

o Energy efficiency projects: $0.5 million over the next ten years (half for each of water supply and sewerage)

·   Water supply:

o Mullumbimby water supply security: $5 million

o Energy efficiency projects: $0.5 million over the next ten years (half for each of water supply and sewerage).

The financial plans have been updated with this additional expenditure.

 

The proposed additional expenditure is affordable with the sewer and water funds continuing to accumulate significant levels of cash over the longer term.

 

Financial Implications

Financial sustainability of the water supply and sewerage businesses is verified by the strategic business plan.

 

Statutory and Policy Compliance Implications

Compliance with the NSW Government’s Best-Practice Management of Water Supply and Sewerage Guidelines, 2007.

 


BYRON SHIRE COUNCIL

Staff Reports - Infrastructure Services                                                                   4.2

 

 

Report No. 4.2             Urban Recycled Water Commercial Connections Policy

Directorate:                 Infrastructure Services

Report Author:           Peter Rees, Manager Utilities

File No:                        I2017/841

Theme:                         Community Infrastructure

                                      Water Supplies

 

 

Summary:

 

Council considered the draft Urban Recycled Water Commercial Connections Policy at the Ordinary Meeting held 22 June 2017.

 

The draft Policy is now attached for Committee comment.

  

 

RECOMMENDATION:

That Council note the Water, Waste and Sewer Advisory Committee considered the draft Urban Recycled Water Commercial Connections Policy.

Attachments:

 

1        Draft Policy Urban Recycled Water Connections, E2017/62524 , page 23  

 

 


 

Report

 

The recent expansion of the Byron Bay Urban Recycled Water Scheme has broadened the availability of recycled water particularly to the central business district of Byron bay.

 

Various representations have been made to Council concerning the up front costs of connection to the system in some cases being prohibitive.

 

It is an aspiration of the community, encapsulated in the Byron bay Effluent Management Strategy, to maximise the use of recycled water.

 

Accordingly Council has prepared the attached draft policy that will allow Council to pay the costs of the initial connection and recover the money over time through the levying of drinking water changes for the supply of recycled water.

 

This proposal has been discussed at the Council Strategic Planning workshop in March 2017.

 

Council considered the draft Urban Recycled Water Commercial Connections Policy at the Ordinary Meeting held 22 June 2017.  The report to Council may be viewed at

 

http://byron.infocouncil.biz/Open/2017/06/OC_22062017_AGN_607.PDF

 

The draft Policy is now attached for Committee comment.

 

Financial Implications

 

Any outlay by Council will be recovered over time. The outlay of cash will not have any negative impact on Council’s sewer fund. 

 

The increased use of recycled water will minimise the amount of bulk water purchased from Rous Water which will financially benefit Council.

 

Statutory and Policy Compliance Implications

 

This policy will facilitate the use of recycled water in accordance with the Byron Bay Effluent Management Strategy (2006).

 

NSW Local Government Act, 1993, s68

 

 


BYRON SHIRE COUNCIL

Staff Reports - Infrastructure Services                                                     4.2 - Attachment 1

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BYRON SHIRE COUNCIL

Staff Reports - Infrastructure Services                                                                   4.3

 

 

Report No. 4.3             Water and Sewer Equivalent Tenement Policy Review

Directorate:                 Infrastructure Services

Report Author:           Dean Baulch, Principal Engineer, Systems Planning

File No:                        I2017/1232

Theme:                         Community Infrastructure

                                      Sewerage Services

 

 

Summary:

 

The current ET policy has been in operation since 26 September 2013 and was due for review with the Developer Servicing Plan which was recently adopted by Council Res 16-235 in September 2016.

 

This report presents a draft revised ET Policy based on revised guidelines of the NSW Water Directorate and staff feedback collected since 2013.

  

 

RECOMMENDATION:

1.       That the Draft Water and Sewer Equivalent Policy 2017 be noted and referred to the next ordinary meeting of Council to place it on public exhibition.

Attachments:

 

1        DRAFT Water and Sewer Equivalent Tenement (ET) Policy 2017, E2017/71719 , page 32  

2        Water & Sewer ET Policy Comparison  - Current 2013 version versus 2017 Draft, E2017/85142 , page 47  

 

 


 

 

Information/Background:

 

The ET Policy allows Council to determine Equivalent Tenement figures for new developments to calculate Developer Servicing Charges under Section 64 of the Local Government Act.  The Policy contains two (2) key elements:

 

1.  The definition of the quantum of a standard Equivalent Tenement (ET) which is the demand or loading a development will have on infrastructure in terms of the water consumption or sewage discharge for an average residential dwelling or house; and

 

2.  The ET values for different categories of development.

 

The NSW Water Directorate, recently reviewed the state Section 64 Determinations of Equivalent Tenements Guidelines – which is a direct input and reference into Council’s ET Policy.

 

The attached draft Policy 2017 has included two additional land use categories as a result of the Water Directorate review (being Vet Clinic and Animal Grooming).  None of the ET rates have been changed from the current Policy Rates as a result of the Water Directorate review.  The draft policy also incorporates a number of additional comments, definitions and notes to help clarify what a land use category includes or excludes.

 

The attached comparison document at 2. highlights (in yellow) any differences between the current 2013 Policy and the current day draft, also attached as item 1.

 

Consultation:

 

Internal Staff and the Executive Team.

 

Communicate to:

 

Council

 

 


BYRON SHIRE COUNCIL

Staff Reports - Infrastructure Services                                           4.3 - Attachment 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Draft Policy:

Water and Sewer Equivalent Tenements

2017

 

 

 

 

Water and Sewer Equivalent Tenements Policy

 

 

 

1199090

 


BYRON SHIRE COUNCIL

Staff Reports - Infrastructure Services                                                     4.3 - Attachment 1

 

 

INFORMATION ABOUT THIS DOCUMENT

 

Date Adopted by Council

24 May 2007

Resolution No.

07-277

Policy Responsibility

Infrastructure Services

Review Timeframe

3 Years

Last Review Date:

July 2017

Next Scheduled Review Date

July 2020

 

Document History

Doc No.

Date Amended

Details Comments eg Resolution No.

DM704573

 

Policy No. 07/100 Water And Sewer  Equivalent Tenements Policy For Determining Developer Servicing Charges Adopted May 2007 Resolution No. 07-277

DM680600

30/8/07

Res 07-448 Delete swimming pool rate

DM1099082

11/08/11

Res 11-618 Insert Table numbering.  Res 11-621 Swimming pools to be assessed based on surface area.  Res 11-622 Decrease the value of reduction in waterless composting toilet assessments.

DM1161610

24/11/11

Reported to Council Amended Sewer ET values

DM1199090

02/02/12

Res 11-934 24/11/11 adopted after close of exhibition (2/2/12) – no submissions received (Policy No. 12/001)

E2013/17740

14/03/13

Res 13-134 14/03/13 Remove consideration of residential swimming pools at Item 11.5; (new Policy No. 13/005)

E2013/57161

29/08/13

Res 13-436 29/08/13 Update Clause 4.7 Consolidated Lots. Additional category comments Section 5. Land Use Categories.

E2013/77244

26/11/13

Adopted as per Res No. 13-632

E2017/71719

 

2017 Draft Review

 

Further Document Information and Relationships

Related Legislation

Local Government Act, Water Management Act

Related Policies

Liquid Trade Waste Policy; Revenue Policy

Related Procedures/ Protocols, Statements, documents

Developer Servicing Plans for Water Supply and Sewerage Services
Section 94 Developer Contribution Plans and Local Environmental Plans

 

 


BYRON SHIRE COUNCIL

Staff Reports - Infrastructure Services                                                     4.3 - Attachment 1

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1.      OBJECTIVES............................................................................................................................... 1

2.      POLICY STATEMENT................................................................................................................. 1

3.      POLICY OUTLINE....................................................................................................................... 1

4.      DETERMINATION OF QUANTUM OF DEVELOPER SERVICING CHARGES..................... 3

5.      LAND USE CATEGORIES.......................................................................................................... 5

6.      NOTES & DEFINITIONS........................................................................................................... 10

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:  This page is to be deleted if Table of Contents is more than 1 page in length.

 

 

 

 

 

This Page has been intentionally left blank.

 

 

 

 


BYRON SHIRE COUNCIL

Staff Reports - Infrastructure Services                                                     4.3 - Attachment 1

 

POLICY TITLE

WATER AND SEWER EQUIVALENT TENEMENTS POLICY
(For Determining Developer Servicing Charges)

 

 

1.   OBJECTIVES

This Policy provides guidelines to allow the calculation of Developer Servicing Charges by specifying the demand on Council’s water and sewer services generated by new development

 

2.   POLICY STATEMENT

 

2.1. Equitable Methodology

Council requires an equitable methodology to assess the Developer Servicing Charges for new development to contribute towards the cost of expanding or upgrading Council’s water and sewer infrastructure.

2.2. Calculation of Developer Charges

The calculation of Developer Servicing Charges is based upon the fundamental principle that Council’s investment in assets servicing a development area is fully recovered from that development in accordance with Council’s adopted Development Servicing Plans for Water Supply and Sewerage Services.

2.3. Quantum of Water and Sewer Equivalent Tenement

For the purposes of this policy an equivalent tenement is defined as the average residential water consumption of 630 litres per day per dwelling and sewerage loading of 590 litres per day per dwelling in accordance with Council’s current adopted Developer Servicing Plans. This figure is based upon flow information throughout the urban areas of the Shire and the Section 64 Determination of Equivalent Tenements Guidelines for NSW Local Government Water Authorities by the NSW Water Directorate.

 

3.   POLICY OUTLINE

 

3.1  Purpose

This Policy allows Council to determine Equivalent Tenement figures for new developments to calculate Developer Servicing Charges under Section 64 of the Local Government Act.

3.2  Context

This Policy and the assessment criteria supersede Council’s previous resolutions and methods of calculation.  This Policy is to be read in conjunction with other Byron Shire Council policies and plans including but not limited to Developer Servicing Plans for Water Supply and Sewerage Services, Liquid Trade Waste Approvals Policy; Section 94 Developer Contribution Plans and Local Environmental Plans.

3.3. Definition of an Equivalent Tenement: Water

That for the purpose of this policy an Equivalent Tenement is 630 litres per day of water consumption.  These loadings are the average loading per dwelling .The water figure allows for losses in the water supply network.

3.4. Definition of an Equivalent Tenement: Sewage

That for the purpose of this policy an Equivalent Tenement is 590 litres per day of unmetered sewage discharge.  These loadings are the average loading per dwelling.  The sewer figure allows for base load infiltration to the sewerage system.

3.5. Responsibilities

The responsibilities under this Policy are listed in the table below.

Task

Position/Stakeholder

Recommended Frequency

·   Implementation

·   General Manager

·   Ongoing

·   Review of the Policy and assessment criteria

·   The elected Council

·   Every 3 years

·   Monitoring of water supply and sewerage capacity, demand and usage. (current, approved and approval potential in terms of hydraulic and treatment capacities)

·   Director, Infrastructure Services

·   Ongoing monitoring

·   Detailed assessment every year

·   Compliance

·   Director Sustainable Environment and Economy

·   Director, Infrastructure Services

·   Ongoing

 

 


 

4.   DETERMINATION OF QUANTUM OF DEVELOPER SERVICING CHARGES

 

4.1. Definitions

The definitions of types of usage and standard units shall be made in order to best match the nature of the development with the rate of usage.

Example 1: In Section 5. Land Use Categories, the standard unit reads as “Bed” and is taken to be a single bed equating to one person.  A development indicating a double bed in a proposed development will be assessed as two persons and, hence, two “bed” units.

Example 2: In Section 5. Land Use Categories, the standard units reads as “Floor Area” and is taken to be the “Gross Floor Area” of a development, except where usage is proposed outside of the “Gross Floor Area”, in which case the “Floor Area” shall be equal to the “Gross Floor Area” plus additional area. For example; a beer garden.

4.2. Method of Determination

Council shall use the values in the “Section 64 Determinations of Equivalent Tenements Guidelines” as developed by the NSW Water Directorate as published from time-to-time modified so as to suit Byron Shire Council’s unique circumstances, as provided in Section 5. Land Use Categories.

4.3. Matters of Local Precedence

Matters of Local Precedence have been incorporated into Section 5. Land Use Categories, applied generally where there is no direction given by the Water Directorate’s published guidelines.

4.4. Demand Management Initiatives

Demand management refers to practices that significantly reduce either the volume of water being used and/or the volume of sewage/liquid trade waste being generated by a development and discharged to sewer.

Where mechanisms are included that reduces demand for water or sewer capacity, and is guaranteed by an instrument such as a Section 88b provision, volumes and hence charges maybe reduced.

 

Demand Management Initiative

Reduction Amount

Comment

Waterless Composting Toilets

16% reduction of water and sewerage load[1]

There must be no sewered toilets in the development

Internal and / or External Recycled Water Use

Case by case basis

Depending on the extent and nature of the use

Other

Case by case basis

Depending on the extent and nature of the use


 

4.5. Allowance for existing development

Developer Servicing Charges for new developments will be levied according to the estimated increase in water and sewer demand as specified in Section 5. Land Use Categories. Existing equivalents (entitlements) for developments connected to water supply and sewerage pertaining to the site will be deducted from the total prior to the calculation of the new charges.

4.6. Assessment of new subdivisions

Subdivisions, where the intensity of development has not been defined, shall be assessed using Section 5. Land Use Categories.

4.7. Consolidated lots

Lots which are consolidated as one property for rating purposes (paying a single sewer and/or water access charge) are still considered to carry one ET entitlement per each Lot of developable size (within the planning definition and Council’s applicable Development Control Plan).

4.8. Industrial Uses (not light industrial)

The Director, Infrastructure Services, using data from the developer, comparable uses, Water Directorate figures and the Sewerage Code of Australia as developed by the Water Services Association of Australia, shall assess and determine appropriate ET loads.

4.9. Non-Specified Uses

For uses other than those specified, the Director, Infrastructure Services, using data from comparable uses, Water Directorate figures and the Sewerage Code of Australia as developed by the Water Services Association of Australia, shall assess and determine appropriate ET loads.

5.  
LAND USE CATEGORIES

 

Ref

CATEGORY

STANDARD

UNIT

WATER

ET

SEWER

ET

COMMENTS

Subdivision Categories  -  Intensity Not Defined

1.0

New Torrens Title Subdivision (Intensity Not Defined)

1.1

Residential

Lot

1.00

1.00

 

1.2

Commercial

Lot

1.00

1.00

 

1.3

Light Industrial

Gross Ha

15.00

15.00

 

Residential User Categories  -  Standard ET Figures

2.0

Single Residential Lots (House)

2.1

Standard Residential Torrens Title Lot

(450m2 to 2000m2)

Lot

1.00

1.00

 

2.2

Small Residential Torrens Title Lot

(< 450m2)

Lot

Use rate for Units in Multi-Residential Lots (see 3.0 below)

2.3

Large Residential Torrens Title Lot

(> 2000m2)

Lot

1.20

1.00

 

3.0

Multi-Residential Lots (Medium Density 1 - 2 Storey)

3.1

Dual Occupancy –

1 bedroom

Dwelling

Use Units (see 3.7 to 3.10 below) for a Lot size of less than (<) 450m2 / dwelling.

or

Use 2.1 or 2.3 : Standard Residential Lot size greater than or equal to (>=) 450m2 / dwelling

Example: A dual occupancy ( two dwellings) on a lot of 1000 m2 is assessed as 500 m2 per dwelling and will be 2ET (Ref:2.1)

3.2

Dual Occupancy –

2 bedrooms

Dwelling

3.3

Dual Occupancy –

3 or more bedrooms

Dwelling

3.4

Duplex - 1 bedroom

Dwelling

3.5

Duplex - 2 bedrooms

Dwelling

3.6

Duplex - 3 or more bedrooms (or more)

Dwelling

3.7

Units - 1 bedroom

Dwelling

0.40

0.3250

 

3.8

Units - 2 bedrooms

Dwelling

0.60

0.75487

 

3.9

Units - 3 or more bedrooms (or more)

Dwelling

0.80

1.000.650

 

3.100

Managers Residence**

Dwelling

Use Units

(see 3.7 to 3.9 above)

e.g. Commercial or Industrial Complex

4.0

Multi-Residential Lots (High Density)

4.1

Multi Storey Apartments

(1 bedroom)

Dwelling

0.33

0.50325

 

4.2

Multi Storey Apartments

(2 bedrooms)

Dwelling

0.50

0.48775

 

4.3

Multi Storey Apartments

(3 or more or more bedrooms)

Dwelling

0.67

0.6501.00

 

Commercial User Categories  -  Standard ET Figures

5.0

Accommodation (Permanent)

5.1

Nursing Home / Special Care Home

Bed

0.50

0.4870.75

Limited medical facilities, communal kitchen / laundry

5.2

Self Care Retirement Units / Villas

-

Use Units

(see 3.7 to 3.9 above)

Internal kitchen / laundry facilities

5.3

Self Care Retirement - Serviced Unit (Onsite)

-

No internal kitchen / laundry facilities

5.4

Self Care Retirement - Serviced Unit (Offsite)

Bed

0.30

0.29245

No internal kitchen / laundry facilities

5.5

Boarding House

Bed

0.33

0.32550

Communal kitchen / laundry

5.6

Caravan / Mobile Home Park

(1 bedroom)

Van

0.40

0.32550

 

5.7

Caravan / Mobile Home Park

(2 bedrooms)

Van

0.60

0.75487

Use this if the number of rooms is unknown

5.8

Caravan / Mobile Home Park

(3 bedrooms)

Van

0.80

1.000.650

 

6.0

Accommodation (Short Term)

Peak week loading - use peak occupancy

Caravan Park

6.1

Camping Site (temporary)

Site

0.50

0.4090.63

Site approx. equivalent to average caravan site

6.2

Caravan / Cabin Site (temporary)

Site

0.50

0.4090.63

Also use for on-site caravans / cabins

Other

6.3

Bed & Breakfast / Guest House

Bedroom

0.40

0.3250.50

House based with communal kitchen / laundry. Add 1 ET for the principal dwelling.

6.4

Motel / Hotel / Resort Room

Bedroom

0.30

0.2920.45

Consider food prep, entertainment & sporting separately

6.5

Backpackers / Hostel 

Bed

0.15

0.1490.23

Communal kitchen, small laundry, not serviced

6.6

Extended Stay/Serviced Apartments

-

Use 4.0 Multi-Res lots (High Density)

Self contained (if not, use motel)

7.0

Accommodation (Medical Care)

7.1

Hospital

Bed

0.90

0.9291.43

Includes medical facilities

7.2

Hostel (Medical)

Bed

0.70

0.7211.11

Includes some medical facilities

8.0

Business (Excluding Food Preparation)

General

8.1

Single Retail Shop**

Floor Area m2

0.003

0.003

 

8.2

Supermarket**

Floor Area m2

0.003

0.003

Includes minor food preparation e.g. Deli cabinet

Excludes cooked chickens (See 9.0 Food Preparation)

8.3

Shopping Centre

-

Assess amenities, food preparation area & specific businesses individually

8.4

Offices**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.010004

 

Specific

8.5

Hairdresser / Beauty Salon

Basin

0.50

0.51379

Excludes: spray tanning, tattooing, ear piercing or hair removal

One (1) sink is permitted for hygiene purposes and not counted as a requirement for this activity.

8.6

Laundromat

Machine

0.45

0.46171

 

8.7

Medical Centre / Therapy / Consultation Room

Room

0.40

0.40963

Based on number of consultation rooms. Includes: Dentist, Ophthalmologist, Colonic irrigators, Spa/Health resort

Excludes: Psychologist, Chiropractor, Osteopath, Podiatrist, Kinesiology, Naturopath, Acupuncture, etc. – to be assessed as 8.4 Offices

8.8

Plant Nursery

-

To be considered on a case by case basis

8.9

Car Yard / Showroom**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.004

See 8.4 Offices

8.10

Service Station

Lane

0.60

0.58590

 

8.11

Car Wash – not recycling water

Lane

5.70

5.8669.03

 

8.12

Car Wash – recycling water

Lane

To be considered on a case by case basis

8.13

Escort Agency

Room

0.40

0.32550

 

8.14

Animal Boarding

Floor Area m2

To be considered on a case by case basis

8.15

Vet Clinic or Animal Grooming

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.01

No animal washing or bathing.

8.16

Animal Grooming/Wash

Bath

0.50

0.51379

 

8.17

Self Storage**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.01

Consider the office area only

9.0

Food Preparation

General

9.1

Restaurant / Café

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.00601

Include the Additional floor area for on-street and al fresco dining

9.2

Take Away / Fast Food

(no amenities)

Floor Area m2

0.02

0.01302

Also use for general food preparation

Amenities provided for “employees only”.

9.3

Take Away / Fast Food

(including amenities)

Floor Area m2

0.03

0.0532

Amenities are toilets and hand wash basins provided for use by customers.

9.4

Catering

Floor Area m2

0.02

0.0213

The food preparation area to be considered separately

Specific

9.5

Bakery

-

Use 9.2 Take Away / Fast Food (no amenities)

9.6

Butcher

-

Use 9.2 Take Away / Fast Food (no amenities)

9.7

Fishing Co-op

-

Use 9.2 Take Away / Fast Food (no amenities)

9.8

Bulk Food/Product Storage Area**

-

Use 13.2 Light Industrial.  The food preparation, storage, office areas to be considered separately.

10.0

Entertainment

10.1

Licensed Club

Floor Area m2

The food preparation, entertainment, office areas to be considered separately.

10.2

Pub / Bar

Floor Area m2

0.03

0.03205

The food preparation area to be considered separately

Use 9.1 Restaurant / Café rate for beer garden and balance of area**

10.3

Cinema / Theatre / Public Entertainment**

Seat

0.01

0.01

 

10.4

Function / Conference Centre**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.01

The food preparation area to be considered separately

Use 9.0 Food Preparation

10.5

Special Events and Festivals**

 

Separate and assess the food preparation, entertainment, amenities individually

If more toilets are required to service the events than the existing fixtures then portable amenities may be used.  Developer charges will not be payable for the use of portable amenities that are not connected to water or sewerage

The normal calculation for such types of events nominates 1 WC for each 100 males, 1 urinal for every 10 males, and 1 WC for every 25 females.  These calculations arise from the Building Code of Australia tables, with some interpretation for events i.e. may require more WCs if serving alcohol at the event.

10.6

Marina

Berth

0.60

0.585990

 

11.0

Sporting / Spectator Facilities

General

11.1

Gym / yoga / fitness centre**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.01

The food preparation area to be considered separately

Use 9.0 Food Preparation

Specific

11.2

Hockey Field (artificial surface)

-

To be considered on a case by case basis

11.3

Bowling Alley

Lane

0.35

0.35755

The food preparation and office areas to be considered separately.

11.4

Bowling Green

-

Separate and assess the Food Preparation, Amenities, Irrigation areas individually.

11.5

Private Residential Swimming Pool

Litres

Not considered as per Res 13-134

11.6

Commercial/Public Swimming Pool - Indoor or Outdoor

Litres

To be considered on a case by case basis

Commercial/public swimming pool or spa pool means a swimming pool or spa pool to which the public is admitted, whether free of charge, on payment of a fee or otherwise, including:

(a) a pool to which the public is admitted as an entitlement of membership of a club, or

(b) a pool provided at a workplace for the use of employees, or

(c) a pool provided at a hotel, motel or guest house (including Bed & Breakfast) or at holiday units, or similar facility, for the use of guests, or

(d) a pool provided at a school or hospital.

12.0

Community Facilities

12.1

Child Care Centre / Pre-school

Person

0.06

0.06510

A person includes a student/pupil, teacher and staff member

12.2

Education School (primary & secondary)

Person

0.03

0.0532

A person includes a student/pupil, teacher and staff member

12.3

Education - College, University (tertiary)

Person

0.02

0.0213

Consider and assess the Food Preparation separately

12.4

Correctional Centre

Person

0.50

0.75487

Example: Prison, Gaol

12.5

Church / Place of Worship**

Floor Area m2

0.005

0.005

 

12.6

Community Building / Hall / Library**

Floor Area m2

0.005

0.005

See Clause 6. Notes & Definitions

12.7

Parks / Gardens / Reserves (Irrigation)

-

To be considered on a case by case basis

12.8

Public Amenities (per shower)

Shower

0.40

0.40963

 

12.9

Public Amenities (per WC or Urinal)

WC

or Urinal

0.40

0.40963

The equivalent width of one urinal equals 600mm

Industrial User Categories  -  Standard ET Figures

13.0

Industrial General

13.1

Light Industrial

Gross Ha

15.00

15.00

Gross Ha includes Road Area

(i.e. Length of parcel road frontage x ½ road reserve width)

13.2

Light Industrial**

Floor Area m2

0.003

0.003

For mixed use sites

13.3

Future Unknown - Light

Gross Ha

15.00

15.00

Gross Ha includes Road Area as per comments at 13.1

13.4

Future Unknown - Medium

Gross Ha

30.00

30.00

Gross Ha includes Road Area as per comments at 13.1

13.5

Future Unknown - Heavy

Gross Ha

50.00

50.00

Gross Ha includes Road Area as per comments at 13.1

 

** Rate set by Local Precedence

 

6.   NOTES & DEFINITIONS

 

a.

One (1) Local ET = Town Water Usage of 630 L/day & Sewerage Loading of 590 L/day

b.

The ET rate for units shall be calculated on the basis of each bedroom or a room that could be used as or perceived as a bedroom.

c.

Assessed ET rounded to the second decimal place e.g. calculated at 7.456 ET = 7.46 ET

d.

Ancillary use:

Ancillary means 1. Subordinate; subsidiary. 2. Auxiliary; helping - The definition of ancillary means something that is helping or subordinate, but not as necessary.

A conference room in a holiday complex is NOT ancillary and will attract ET loading.  It is an additional feature of the holiday complex which is essentially approved for short term accommodation.

A bathroom or toilet servicing a number of offices/retail stores in the same building can be considered as ancillary –the bathroom is subordinate to the office in that it is a requirement for people working in the office/retail store. The offices/retail stores attract the ET load already.

A baggage store at a hotel can argued to be ancillary as it is only used for temporary storage and security of luggage for people prior to departure.  It’s not occupied by people that would create an ET load.

The use of the word Ancillary in the EP&A Act and Regulations is not the same as it is used in this policy.

e.

Bed” is taken to be a single bed equating to one person

f.

A “bedroom” is any habitable room that, in the opinion of Council, by its physical design, designated or capable of being used as a bedroom including separably accessible rooms designated a bedroom, study, studio, den, attic, media room, home office or the like other than a kitchen, WC, bathroom or laundry.

g.

A "bulk store" means a building or place used for the warehousing of goods, where the goods stored or to be stored are not required for use in a shop or commercial premises on the same parcel of land or on the adjoining land in the same ownership.

h.

A community building” means a building or place owned, occupied or operated by the council or another public or local authority and used to provide facilities comprising or relating to any one or more of the following:

(a)  a library, rest room, meeting room, neighbourhood centre, senior citizens centre, youth centre, welfare centre or any similar place, or

(b)  health centre or place providing similar services, or

(c)  indoor recreation, child minding or any similar activity, or

(d)  arts and craft centre, information centre or kiosk.

i.

Developable Size:  refer to Byron Local Environment Plan 2014 and/or Council’s current Development Control Plan for guidance on minimum size of a Developable Lot.

j.

Dry weather flow definition:

The average daily flow to the treatment works during seven consecutive days without rain (excluding a period which includes public holidays) following seven days during which the rainfall did not exceed 0.25 millimetres on any one day.

k.

Floor Area” is taken to be the “Gross Floor Area” of a development, except where usage is proposed outside of the “Gross Floor Area”, in which case the “Floor Area” shall be equal to the “Gross Floor Area” plus additional area

l.

Restaurant versus Take Away:

Restaurant or cafe means a building or place the principal purpose of which is the preparation and serving, on a retail basis, of food and drink to people for consumption on the premises.

Take Away food and drink premises means premises that are predominantly used for the preparation and retail sale of food or drink (or both) for immediate consumption away from the premises.

m.

A “swimming pool”, including a spa, is subject to Public Health Act 2010 & Regulation 2012 requirements.

Water and sewerage load demands from the pool will be generated by top-up water requirements due to splash-out, evaporation, backwash water demand and backwash water discharged to sewer. Reference is made to the “NSW Heath - Swimming Pool and Spa Advisory Document 2013” to calculate loadings, consideration is given to:

•        The volume of the pool.

•        cross-sections of the pool structure which show depths.

•        The turnover rate of the pool.

•        The daily volume of make-up water required for the pool.

•        The daily volume of backwash water discharged to sewer.

n.

Torrens Title Lot versus Strata Lot:

Strata lots are only air space sitting on a parent Torrens Title Lot; it is intent of the policy to deal only with Torrens title lots.  Hence, a strata lot is assessed as a dwelling or for the land use category itself.

A vacant strata lot, without a specified land use, will be assessed as one (1) ET.

From Water Management Regulations:

WATER MANAGEMENT (GENERAL) REGULATION 2011 - REG 139  Sewerage service not to be shared

Subclause (4) For the purposes of this clause, the separate lots in a strata scheme under the Strata Schemes (Freehold Development) Act 1973 or the Strata Schemes (Leasehold Development) Act 1986 are taken to constitute a single parcel of land.

o.

Additional definitions – may use dictionary in the Byron Local Environment Plan 2014 or words and phrases are not defined in LEP 2014 then refer to the meaning defined in the Dictionary contained in Appendix A1 of the Byron Shire Development Control Plan 2014

 

POLICY TITLE

IN CAPS, NOT BOLD


BYRON SHIRE COUNCIL

Staff Reports - Infrastructure Services                                                                               4.3 - Attachment 2

CURRENT POLICY 13/005

 

 

POLICY TITLE

WATER AND SEWER EQUIVALENT TENEMENTS POLICY
(For Determining Developer Servicing Charges)

 

 

1.   OBJECTIVES

This Policy provides guidelines to allow the calculation of Developer Servicing Charges by specifying the demand on Council’s water and sewer services generated by new development

 

2.   POLICY STATEMENT

 

2.1.       Equitable Methodology

Council requires an equitable methodology to assess the Developer Servicing Charges for new development to contribute towards the cost of expanding or upgrading Council’s water and sewer infrastructure.

2.2.       Calculation of Developer Charges

The calculation of Developer Servicing Charges is based upon the fundamental principle that Council’s investment in assets servicing a development area is fully recovered from that development in accordance with Council’s adopted Development Servicing Plans for Water Supply and Sewerage Services.

2.3.       Quantum of Water and Sewer Equivalent Tenement

For the purposes of this policy an equivalent tenement is defined as the average residential water consumption of 630 litres per day per dwelling and sewerage loading of 590 litres per day per dwelling in accordance with Council’s current adopted Developer Servicing Plans. This figure is based upon flow information throughout the urban areas of the Shire and the Section 64 Determination of Equivalent Tenements Guidelines for NSW Local Government Water Authorities by the NSW Water Directorate.

 

3.   POLICY OUTLINE

 

3.1     Purpose

This Policy allows Council to determine Equivalent Tenement figures for new developments to calculate Developer Servicing Charges under Section 64 of the Local Government Act.

3.2     Context

This Policy and the assessment criteria supersede Council’s previous resolutions and methods of calculation.  This Policy is to be read in conjunction with other Byron Shire Council policies and plans including but not limited to Developer Servicing Plans for Water Supply and Sewerage Services, Liquid Trade Waste Approvals Policy; Section 94 Developer Contribution Plans and Local Environmental Plans.

3.3.       Definition of an Equivalent Tenement: Water

That for the purpose of this policy an Equivalent Tenement is 630 litres per day of water consumption.  These loadings are the average loading per dwelling .The water figure allows for losses in the water supply network.


DRAFT POLICY 2017

 

 

POLICY TITLE

WATER AND SEWER EQUIVALENT TENEMENTS POLICY
(For Determining Developer Servicing Charges)

 

 

1.   OBJECTIVES

This Policy provides guidelines to allow the calculation of Developer Servicing Charges by specifying the demand on Council’s water and sewer services generated by new development

 

2.   POLICY STATEMENT

 

2.1.       Equitable Methodology

Council requires an equitable methodology to assess the Developer Servicing Charges for new development to contribute towards the cost of expanding or upgrading Council’s water and sewer infrastructure.

2.2.       Calculation of Developer Charges

The calculation of Developer Servicing Charges is based upon the fundamental principle that Council’s investment in assets servicing a development area is fully recovered from that development in accordance with Council’s adopted Development Servicing Plans for Water Supply and Sewerage Services.

2.3.       Quantum of Water and Sewer Equivalent Tenement

For the purposes of this policy an equivalent tenement is defined as the average residential water consumption of 630 litres per day per dwelling and sewerage loading of 590 litres per day per dwelling in accordance with Council’s current adopted Developer Servicing Plans. This figure is based upon flow information throughout the urban areas of the Shire and the Section 64 Determination of Equivalent Tenements Guidelines for NSW Local Government Water Authorities by the NSW Water Directorate.

 

3.   POLICY OUTLINE

 

3.1         Purpose

This Policy allows Council to determine Equivalent Tenement figures for new developments to calculate Developer Servicing Charges under Section 64 of the Local Government Act.

3.2         Context

This Policy and the assessment criteria supersede Council’s previous resolutions and methods of calculation.  This Policy is to be read in conjunction with other Byron Shire Council policies and plans including but not limited to Developer Servicing Plans for Water Supply and Sewerage Services, Liquid Trade Waste Approvals Policy; Section 94 Developer Contribution Plans and Local Environmental Plans.

3.3.       Definition of an Equivalent Tenement: Water

That for the purpose of this policy an Equivalent Tenement is 630 litres per day of water consumption.  These loadings are the average loading per dwelling .The water figure allows for losses in the water supply network.

3.4.       Definition of an Equivalent Tenement: Sewage

That for the purpose of this policy an Equivalent Tenement is 590 litres per day of unmetered sewage discharge.  These loadings are the average loading per dwelling.  The sewer figure allows for base load infiltration to the sewerage system.

3.5.       Responsibilities

The responsibilities under this Policy are listed in the table below.

Task

Position/Stakeholder

Recommended Frequency

§ Implementation

§ General Manager

§ Ongoing

§ Review of the Policy and assessment criteria

§ The elected Council

§ Every 3 years

§ Monitoring of water supply and sewerage capacity, demand and usage. (current, approved and approval potential in terms of hydraulic and treatment capacities)

§ Executive Manager, Water and Recycling

§ Ongoing monitoring

§ Detailed assessment every year

§ Compliance

§ Executive Manager, Environment and Planning

§ Executive Manager, Water and Recycling

§ Ongoing

 

3.4.      
Definition of an Equivalent Tenement: Sewage

That for the purpose of this policy an Equivalent Tenement is 590 litres per day of unmetered sewage discharge.  These loadings are the average loading per dwelling.  The sewer figure allows for base load infiltration to the sewerage system.

3.5.       Responsibilities

The responsibilities under this Policy are listed in the table below.

Task

Position/Stakeholder

Recommended Frequency

·   Implementation

·   General Manager

·   Ongoing

·   Review of the Policy and assessment criteria

·   The elected Council

·   Every 3 years

·   Monitoring of water supply and sewerage capacity, demand and usage. (current, approved and approval potential in terms of hydraulic and treatment capacities)

·   Director, Infrastructure Services

·   Ongoing monitoring

·   Detailed assessment every year

·   Compliance

·   Director Sustainable Environment and Economy

·   Director, Infrastructure Services

·   Ongoing

 

 


 

 

4.   DETERMINATION OF QUANTUM OF DEVELOPER SERVICING CHARGES

 

4.1.       Definitions

The definitions of types of usage and standard units shall be made in order to best match the nature of the development with the rate of usage.

Example 1: In Appendix A, the standard unit reads as “Bed” and is taken to be a single bed equating to one person.  A development indicating a double bed in a proposed development will be assessed as two persons and, hence, two “bed” units.

Example 2: In Appendix A, the standard units reads as “Floor Area” and is taken to be the “Gross Floor Area” of a development, except where usage is proposed outside of the “Gross Floor Area”, in which case the “Floor Area” shall be equal to the “Gross Floor Area” plus additional area. For example; a beer garden.

4.2.       Method of Determination

Council shall use the values in the “Section 64 Determinations of Equivalent Tenements Guidelines” as developed by the NSW Water Directorate as published from time-to-time modified so as to suit Byron Shire Council’s unique circumstances, as provided in Appendix A.

4.3.       Matters of Local Precedence

Matters of Local Precedence have been incorporated into Appendix A, applied generally where there is no direction given by the Water Directorate’s published guidelines.

4.4.       Demand Management Initiatives

Demand management refers to practices that significantly reduce either the volume of water being used and/or the volume of sewage/liquid trade waste being generated by a development and discharged to sewer.

Where mechanisms are included that reduces demand for water or sewer capacity, and is guaranteed by an instrument such as a Section 88b provision, volumes and hence charges maybe reduced.

 

Demand Management Initiative

Reduction Amount

Comment

Waterless Composting Toilets

16% reduction of water and sewerage load

There must be no sewered toilets in the development

Internal and / or External Recycled Water Use

Case by case basis

Depending on the extent and nature of the use

Other

Case by case basis

Depending on the extent and nature of the use

 


 

4.   DETERMINATION OF QUANTUM OF DEVELOPER SERVICING CHARGES

 

4.1.       Definitions

The definitions of types of usage and standard units shall be made in order to best match the nature of the development with the rate of usage.

Example 1: In Section 5. Land Use Categories, the standard unit reads as “Bed” and is taken to be a single bed equating to one person.  A development indicating a double bed in a proposed development will be assessed as two persons and, hence, two “bed” units.

Example 2: In Section 5. Land Use Categories, the standard units reads as “Floor Area” and is taken to be the “Gross Floor Area” of a development, except where usage is proposed outside of the “Gross Floor Area”, in which case the “Floor Area” shall be equal to the “Gross Floor Area” plus additional area. For example; a beer garden.

4.2.       Method of Determination

Council shall use the values in the “Section 64 Determinations of Equivalent Tenements Guidelines” as developed by the NSW Water Directorate as published from time-to-time modified so as to suit Byron Shire Council’s unique circumstances, as provided in Section 5. Land Use Categories.

4.3.       Matters of Local Precedence

Matters of Local Precedence have been incorporated into Section 5. Land Use Categories, applied generally where there is no direction given by the Water Directorate’s published guidelines.

4.4.       Demand Management Initiatives

Demand management refers to practices that significantly reduce either the volume of water being used and/or the volume of sewage/liquid trade waste being generated by a development and discharged to sewer.

Where mechanisms are included that reduces demand for water or sewer capacity, and is guaranteed by an instrument such as a Section 88b provision, volumes and hence charges maybe reduced.

 

Demand Management Initiative

Reduction Amount

Comment

Waterless Composting Toilets

16% reduction of water and sewerage load

There must be no sewered toilets in the development

Internal and / or External Recycled Water Use

Case by case basis

Depending on the extent and nature of the use

Other

Case by case basis

Depending on the extent and nature of the use


 

 

4.5.       Allowance for existing development

Developer Servicing Charges for new developments will be levied according to the estimated increase in water and sewer demand as specified in the appendices. Existing equivalents (entitlements) for developments connected to water supply and sewerage pertaining to the site will be deducted from the total prior to the calculation of the new charges.

4.6.       Assessment of new subdivisions

Subdivisions, where the intensity of development has not been defined, shall be assessed using Appendix A.

4.7.       Consolidated lots

Lots which are consolidated as one property for rating purposes (paying a single sewer and/or water access charge) are still considered to carry one ET entitlement per each Lot of developable size (within the planning definition).

4.8.       Industrial Uses (not light industrial)

The Executive Manager of Water and Recycling, using data from the developer, comparable uses, Water Directorate figures and the Sewerage Code of Australia as developed by the Water Services Association of Australia, shall assess and determine appropriate ET loads.

4.9.       Non-Specified Uses

For uses other than those specified, the Executive Manager of Water and Recycling, using data from comparable uses, Water Directorate figures and the Sewerage Code of Australia as developed by the Water Services Association of Australia, shall assess and determine appropriate ET loads.


4.5.       Allowance for existing development

Developer Servicing Charges for new developments will be levied according to the estimated increase in water and sewer demand as specified in Section 5. Land Use Categories. Existing equivalents (entitlements) for developments connected to water supply and sewerage pertaining to the site will be deducted from the total prior to the calculation of the new charges.

4.6.       Assessment of new subdivisions

Subdivisions, where the intensity of development has not been defined, shall be assessed using Section 5. Land Use Categories.

4.7.       Consolidated lots

Lots which are consolidated as one property for rating purposes (paying a single sewer and/or water access charge) are still considered to carry one ET entitlement per each Lot of developable size (within the planning definition and Council’s applicable Development Control Plan).

4.8.       Industrial Uses (not light industrial)

The Director, Infrastructure Services, using data from the developer, comparable uses, Water Directorate figures and the Sewerage Code of Australia as developed by the Water Services Association of Australia, shall assess and determine appropriate ET loads.

4.9.       Non-Specified Uses

For uses other than those specified, the Director, Infrastructure Services, using data from comparable uses, Water Directorate figures and the Sewerage Code of Australia as developed by the Water Services Association of Australia, shall assess and determine appropriate ET loads.

 

5.  
APPENDIX A

 

Ref

CATEGORY

STANDARD

UNIT

WATER

ET

SEWER

ET

COMMENTS

Subdivision Categories  -  Intensity Not Defined

1.0

New Subdivision (Intensity Not Defined)

1.1

Residential

Lot

1.00

1.00

 

1.2

Commercial

Lot

1.00

1.00

 

1.3

Light Industrial

Gross Ha

15.00

15.00

 

Residential User Categories  -  Standard ET Figures

2.0

Single Residential Lots (House)

2.1

Standard Residential Lot (450m2 to 2000m2)

Lot

1.00

1.00

 

2.2

Small Residential Lot   (< 450m2)

Lot

Use rate for Units in Multi-Residential Lots (see 3.0 below)

2.3

Large Residential Lot   (> 2000m2)

Lot

1.20

1.00

 

3.0

Multi-Residential Lots (Medium Density 1 - 2 Storey)

3.1

Dual Occupancy –

1 bedroom

Dwelling

Use Units (see 3.7 to 3.9 below) for a Lot size of

less than (<) 450m2 / dwelling

or

Use 2.1: Standard Residential Lot size greater than

or equal to (>=) 450m2 / dwelling

 

Example: A dual occupancy (two dwellings) on a lot of

1000 m2 is assessed as 500 m2 per dwelling and will be 2ET (Ref: 2.1)

3.2

Dual Occupancy –

2 bedrooms

Dwelling

3.3

Dual Occupancy –

 3 or more bedrooms

Dwelling

3.4

Duplex - 1 bedroom

Dwelling

3.5

Duplex - 2 bedrooms

Dwelling

3.6

Duplex - 3 or more bedrooms (or more)

Dwelling

3.7

Units - 1 bedroom

Dwelling

0.40

0.50

 

3.8

Units - 2 bedrooms

Dwelling

0.60

0.75

 

3.9

Units - 3 or more bedrooms (or more)

Dwelling

0.80

1.00

 

3.10

Managers Residence**

Dwelling

Use Units

(see 3.7 to 3.9 above)

e.g. Commercial or Industrial Complex

4.0

Multi-Residential Lots (High Density)

4.1

Multi Storey Apartments

(1 bedroom)

Dwelling

0.33

0.50

 

4.2

Multi Storey Apartments

(2 bedrooms)

Dwelling

0.50

0.75

 

4.3

Multi Storey Apartments

(3 or more or more bedrooms)

Dwelling

0.67

1.00

 

5.  
LAND USE CATEGORIES

 

Ref

CATEGORY

STANDARD

UNIT

WATER

ET

SEWER

ET

COMMENTS

Subdivision Categories  -  Intensity Not Defined

1.0

New Torrens Title Subdivision (Intensity Not Defined)

1.1

Residential

Lot

1.00

1.00

 

1.2

Commercial

Lot

1.00

1.00

 

1.3

Light Industrial

Gross Ha

15.00

15.00

 

Residential User Categories  -  Standard ET Figures

2.0

Single Residential Lots (House)

2.1

Standard Residential Torrens Title Lot

(450m2 to 2000m2)

Lot

1.00

1.00

 

2.2

Small Residential Torrens Title Lot

(< 450m2)

Lot

Use rate for Units in Multi-Residential Lots (see 3.0 below)

2.3

Large Residential Torrens Title Lot

(> 2000m2)

Lot

1.20

1.00

 

3.0

Multi-Residential Lots (Medium Density 1 - 2 Storey)

3.1

Dual Occupancy –

1 bedroom

Dwelling

Use Units (see 3.7 to 3.10 below) for a Lot size of less than (<) 450m2 / dwelling.

or

Use 2.1 or 2.3 : Standard Residential Lot size greater than or equal to (>=) 450m2 / dwelling

Example: A dual occupancy ( two dwellings) on a lot of 1000 m2 is assessed as 500 m2 per dwelling and will be 2ET (Ref:2.1)

3.2

Dual Occupancy –

2 bedrooms

Dwelling

3.3

Dual Occupancy –

3 or more bedrooms

Dwelling

3.4

Duplex - 1 bedroom

Dwelling

3.5

Duplex - 2 bedrooms

Dwelling

3.6

Duplex - 3 or more bedrooms (or more)

Dwelling

3.7

Units - 1 bedroom

Dwelling

0.40

0.3250

 

3.8

Units - 2 bedrooms

Dwelling

0.60

0.75487

 

3.9

Units - 3 or more bedrooms (or more)

Dwelling

0.80

1.000.650

 

3.100

Managers Residence**

Dwelling

Use Units

(see 3.7 to 3.9 above)

e.g. Commercial or Industrial Complex

4.0

Multi-Residential Lots (High Density)

4.1

Multi Storey Apartments

(1 bedroom)

Dwelling

0.33

0.50325

 

4.2

Multi Storey Apartments

(2 bedrooms)

Dwelling

0.50

0.48775

 

4.3

Multi Storey Apartments

(3 or more or more bedrooms)

Dwelling

0.67

0.6501.00

 


 

5.0

Accommodation (Permanent)

5.1

Nursing Home / Special Care Home

Bed

0.50

0.75

Limited medical facilities, communal kitchen / laundry

5.2

Self Care Retirement Units / Villas

-

Use Units

(see 3.7 to 3.9 above)

Internal kitchen / laundry facilities

5.3

Self Care Retirement - Serviced Unit (Onsite)

-

No internal kitchen / laundry facilities

5.4

Self Care Retirement - Serviced Unit (Offsite)

Bed

0.30

0.45

No internal kitchen / laundry facilities

5.5

Boarding House

Bed

0.33

0.50

Communal kitchen / laundry

5.6

Caravan / Mobile Home Park

(1 bedroom)

Van

0.40

0.50

 

5.7

Caravan / Mobile Home Park

(2 bedrooms)

Van

0.60

0.75

Use this if the number of rooms is unknown

5.8

Caravan / Mobile Home Park

(3 bedrooms)

Van

0.80

1.00

 

6.0

Accommodation (Short Term)

Peak day loading - use peak occupancy

Caravan Park

6.1

Camping Site (temporary)

Site

0.50

0.63

Site approx. equivalent to average caravan site

6.2

Caravan / Cabin Site (temporary)

Site

0.50

0.63

Also use for on-site caravans / cabins

Other

6.3

Bed & Breakfast / Guest House

Room

0.40

0.50

House based with communal kitchen / laundry

6.4

Motel / Hotel / Resort Room

Room

0.30

0.45

Consider food prep, entertainment & sporting separately

6.5

Backpackers / Hostel 

Bed

0.15

0.23

Communal kitchen, small laundry, not serviced

6.6

Serviced / Un-serviced Apartments

-

Use 4.0 Multi-Res lots (High Density)

Self contained (if not, use motel)

7.0

Accommodation (Medical Care)

7.1

Hospital

Bed

0.90

1.43

Includes medical facilities

7.2

Hostel (Medical)

Bed

0.70

1.11

Includes some medical facilities

8.0

Business (Excluding Food Preparation)

General

8.1

Single Retail Shop**

Floor Area m2

0.003

0.003

 

 


 

5.0

Accommodation (Permanent)

5.1

Nursing Home / Special Care Home

Bed

0.50

0.4870.75

Limited medical facilities, communal kitchen / laundry

5.2

Self Care Retirement Units / Villas

-

Use Units

(see 3.7 to 3.9 above)

Internal kitchen / laundry facilities

5.3

Self Care Retirement - Serviced Unit (Onsite)

-

No internal kitchen / laundry facilities

5.4

Self Care Retirement - Serviced Unit (Offsite)

Bed

0.30

0.29245

No internal kitchen / laundry facilities

5.5

Boarding House

Bed

0.33

0.32550

Communal kitchen / laundry

5.6

Caravan / Mobile Home Park

(1 bedroom)

Van

0.40

0.32550

 

5.7

Caravan / Mobile Home Park

(2 bedrooms)

Van

0.60

0.75487

Use this if the number of rooms is unknown

5.8

Caravan / Mobile Home Park

(3 bedrooms)

Van

0.80

1.000.650

 

6.0

Accommodation (Short Term)

Peak week loading - use peak occupancy

Caravan Park

6.1

Camping Site (temporary)

Site

0.50

0.4090.63

Site approx. equivalent to average caravan site

6.2

Caravan / Cabin Site (temporary)

Site

0.50

0.4090.63

Also use for on-site caravans / cabins

Other

6.3

Bed & Breakfast / Guest House

Bedroom

0.40

0.3250.50

House based with communal kitchen / laundry. Add 1 ET for the principal dwelling.

6.4

Motel / Hotel / Resort Room

Bedroom

0.30

0.2920.45

Consider food prep, entertainment & sporting separately

6.5

Backpackers / Hostel 

Bed

0.15

0.1490.23

Communal kitchen, small laundry, not serviced

6.6

Extended Stay/Serviced Apartments

-

Use 4.0 Multi-Res lots (High Density)

Self contained (if not, use motel)

7.0

Accommodation (Medical Care)

7.1

Hospital

Bed

0.90

0.9291.43

Includes medical facilities

7.2

Hostel (Medical)

Bed

0.70

0.7211.11

Includes some medical facilities

8.0

Business (Excluding Food Preparation)

General

8.1

Single Retail Shop**

Floor Area m2

0.003

0.003

 


 

8.2

Supermarket**

Floor Area m2

0.003

0.003

Includes minor food preparation e.g. Deli cabinet

Excludes cooked chickens (See 9.0 Food Preparation)

8.3

Shopping Centre

-

Assess amenities, food preparation area & specific businesses individually

8.4

Offices**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.004

 

Specific

8.5

Hairdresser / Beauty Salon

Basin

0.50

0.79

Excludes: Tattooing, Ear piercing or Hair Removal

8.6

Laundromat

Machine

0.45

0.71

 

8.7

Medical Centre / Therapy / Consultation Room

Room

0.40

0.63

Based on number of consultation rooms. Includes: Dentist, Ophthalmologist, Colonic Irrigators, Spa/Health Resort

Excludes: Chiropractor, Osteopath, Podiatrist, Kinesiology, Naturopath, Acupuncture

8.8

Plant Nursery

-

To be considered on a case by case basis

8.9

Car Yard / Showroom

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.004

See 8.4 Offices

8.10

Service Station

Lane

0.60

0.90

 

8.11

Car Wash – not recycling water

Lane

5.70

9.03

 

8.12

Car Wash – recycling water

Lane

To be considered on a case by case basis

8.13

Escort Agency

Room

0.40

0.50

 

8.14

Animal Boarding

-

To be considered on a case by case basis

8.15

Self Storage**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.01

Consider the office area only

9.0

Food Preparation

General

9.1

Restaurant / Café

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.01

Include the additional floor area for on-street and al fresco dining

 

 


 


8.2

Supermarket**

Floor Area m2

0.003

0.003

Includes minor food preparation e.g. Deli cabinet

Excludes cooked chickens (See 9.0 Food Preparation)

8.3

Shopping Centre

-

Assess amenities, food preparation area & specific businesses individually

8.4

Offices**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.010004

 

Specific

8.5

Hairdresser / Beauty Salon

Basin

0.50

0.51379

Excludes: spray tanning, tattooing, ear piercing or hair removal

One (1) sink is permitted for hygiene purposes and not counted as a requirement for this activity.

8.6

Laundromat

Machine

0.45

0.46171

 

8.7

Medical Centre / Therapy / Consultation Room

Room

0.40

0.40963

Based on number of consultation rooms. Includes: Dentist, Ophthalmologist, Colonic irrigators, Spa/Health resort

Excludes: Psychologist, Chiropractor, Osteopath, Podiatrist, Kinesiology, Naturopath, Acupuncture, etc. – to be assessed as 8.4 Offices

8.8

Plant Nursery

-

To be considered on a case by case basis

8.9

Car Yard / Showroom**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.004

See 8.4 Offices

8.10

Service Station

Lane

0.60

0.58590

 

8.11

Car Wash – not recycling water

Lane

5.70

5.8669.03

 

8.12

Car Wash – recycling water

Lane

To be considered on a case by case basis

8.13

Escort Agency

Room

0.40

0.32550

 

8.14

Animal Boarding

Floor Area m2

To be considered on a case by case basis

8.15

Vet Clinic or Animal Grooming

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.01

No animal washing or bathing.

8.16

Animal Grooming/Wash

Bath

0.50

0.51379

 

8.17

Self Storage**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.01

Consider the office area only

9.0

Food Preparation

General

9.1

Restaurant / Café

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.00601

Include the Additional floor area for on-street and al fresco dining


 

9.2

Take Away / Fast Food (no amenities)

Floor Area m2

0.02

0.02

Also use for general food preparation

Amenities provided for “employees only”.

 

9.3

Take Away / Fast Food (including amenities)

Floor Area m2

0.03

0.05

Amenities are toilets and hand wash basins for use by customers.

 

9.4

Catering

Floor Area m2

0.02

0.02

The food preparation area to be considered separately

 

Specific

 

9.5

Bakery

-

Use 9.2 Take Away / Fast Food (no amenities)

 

9.6

Butcher

-

Use 9.2 Take Away / Fast Food (no amenities)

 

9.7

Fishing Co-op

-

Use 9.2 Take Away / Fast Food (no amenities)

 

9.8

Bulk Food/Product Storage Area**

-

Use 13.2 Light Industrial.  The food preparation, storage, office areas to be considered separately.

 

10.0

Entertainment

 

10.1

Licensed Club

Floor Area m2

The food preparation, entertainment, office areas to be considered separately.

 

10.2

Pub / Bar

Floor Area m2

0.03

0.05

The food preparation area to be considered separately

Use 9.1 Restaurant / Café rate for beer garden and balance of area**

 

10.3

Cinema / Theatre / Public Entertainment**

Seat

0.01

0.01

 

 

10.4

Function / Conference Centre**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.01

The food preparation area to be considered separately

Use 9.0 Food Preparation

 

10.5

Special Events and Festivals**

 

Separate and assess the food preparation, entertainment, amenities individually

If more toilets are required to service the events than the existing fixtures then portable amenities may be used.  Developer charges will not be payable for the use of portable amenities that are not connected to water or sewerage

 

10.6

Marina

Berth

0.60

0.90

 

 

11.0

Sporting / Spectator Facilities

 

General

 

11.1

Gym / yoga / fitness centre**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.01

The food preparation area to be considered separately

Use 9.0 Food Preparation

 

Specific

 

11.2

Hockey Field (artificial surface)

-

To be considered on a case by case basis

 

11.3

Bowling Alley

Lane

0.35

0.55

The food preparation and office areas to be considered separately.

 

11.4

Bowling Green

-

Separate and assess the Food Preparation, Amenities, Irrigation areas individually.

 



9.2

Take Away / Fast Food

(no amenities)

Floor Area m2

0.02

0.01302

Also use for general food preparation

Amenities provided for “employees only”.

9.3

Take Away / Fast Food

(including amenities)

Floor Area m2

0.03

0.0532

Amenities are toilets and hand wash basins provided for use by customers.

9.4

Catering

Floor Area m2

0.02

0.0213

The food preparation area to be considered separately

Specific

9.5

Bakery

-

Use 9.2 Take Away / Fast Food (no amenities)

9.6

Butcher

-

Use 9.2 Take Away / Fast Food (no amenities)

9.7

Fishing Co-op

-

Use 9.2 Take Away / Fast Food (no amenities)

9.8

Bulk Food/Product Storage Area**

-

Use 13.2 Light Industrial.  The food preparation, storage, office areas to be considered separately.

10.0

Entertainment

10.1

Licensed Club

Floor Area m2

The food preparation, entertainment, office areas to be considered separately.

10.2

Pub / Bar

Floor Area m2

0.03

0.03205

The food preparation area to be considered separately

Use 9.1 Restaurant / Café rate for beer garden and balance of area**

10.3

Cinema / Theatre / Public Entertainment**

Seat

0.01

0.01

 

10.4

Function / Conference Centre**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.01

The food preparation area to be considered separately

Use 9.0 Food Preparation

10.5

Special Events and Festivals**

 

Separate and assess the food preparation, entertainment, amenities individually

If more toilets are required to service the events than the existing fixtures then portable amenities may be used.  Developer charges will not be payable for the use of portable amenities that are not connected to water or sewerage

The normal calculation for such types of events nominates 1 WC for each 100 males, 1 urinal for every 10 males, and 1 WC for every 25 females.  These calculations arise from the Building Code of Australia tables, with some interpretation for events i.e. may require more WCs if serving alcohol at the event.

10.6

Marina

Berth

0.60

0.585990

 

11.0

Sporting / Spectator Facilities

General

11.1

Gym / yoga / fitness centre**

Floor Area m2

0.01

0.01

The food preparation area to be considered separately

Use 9.0 Food Preparation

11.2

Hockey Field (artificial surface)

-

To be considered on a case by case basis

11.3

Bowling Alley

Lane

0.35

0.35755

The food preparation and office areas to be considered separately.

11.4

Bowling Green

-

Separate and assess the Food Preparation, Amenities, Irrigation areas individually.


 

11.6

Swimming Pool - Indoor

ML

To be considered on a case by case basis

11.7

Swimming Pool - Outdoor

ML

To be considered on a case by case basis

12.0

Assembly Type Facilities

12.1

Child Care Centre / Pre-school

Person

0.06

0.10

 

12.2

Education - School (primary & secondary)

Person

0.03

0.05

 

12.3

Education - College, University (tertiary)

Person

0.02

0.02

Consider and assess the Food Preparation separately

12.4

Correctional Centre

Person

0.50

0.75

Example: Prison, Gaol

12.5

Church / Place of Worship**

Floor Area m2

0.005

0.005

 

12.6

Community Building / Hall / Library**

Floor Area m2

0.005

0.005

Refer to dictionary in the Byron Local Environment Plan 1988 for Community Building

12.7

Parks / Gardens / Reserves (Irrigation)

-

To be considered on a case by case basis

12.8

Public Amenities (per shower)

Shower

0.40

0.63

 

12.9

Public Amenities (per WC or Urinal)

WC

or Urinal

0.40

0.63

The equivalent width of one urinal equals 600mm

Industrial User Categories  -  Standard ET Figures

13.0

Industrial General

13.1

Light Industrial

Gross Ha

15.00

15.00

Gross Ha includes Road Area

(i.e. Length of parcel road frontage x ½ road reserve width)

13.2

Light Industrial**

Floor Area m2

0.003

0.003

For mixed use sites

13.3

Future Unknown - Light

Gross Ha

15.00

15.00

Gross Ha includes Road Area as per comments at 13.1

13.4

Future Unknown - Medium

Gross Ha

30.00

30.00

Gross Ha includes Road Area as per comments at 13.1

13.5

Future Unknown - Heavy

Gross Ha

50.00

50.00

Gross Ha includes Road Area as per comments at 13.1

 

** Rate set by Local Precedence

 

Notes on following page.


 

11.5

Private Residential Swimming Pool

Litres

Not considered as per Res 13-134

11.6

Commercial/Public Swimming Pool - Indoor or Outdoor

Litres

To be considered on a case by case basis

Commercial/public swimming pool or spa pool means a swimming pool or spa pool to which the public is admitted, whether free of charge, on payment of a fee or otherwise, including:

(a) a pool to which the public is admitted as an entitlement of membership of a club, or

(b) a pool provided at a workplace for the use of employees, or

(c) a pool provided at a hotel, motel or guest house (including Bed & Breakfast) or at holiday units, or similar facility, for the use of guests, or

(d) a pool provided at a school or hospital.

12.0

Community Facilities

12.1

Child Care Centre / Pre-school

Person

0.06

0.06510

A person includes a student/pupil, teacher and staff member

12.2

Education School (primary & secondary)

Person

0.03

0.0532

A person includes a student/pupil, teacher and staff member

12.3

Education - College, University (tertiary)

Person

0.02

0.0213

Consider and assess the Food Preparation separately

12.4

Correctional Centre

Person

0.50

0.75487

Example: Prison, Gaol

12.5

Church / Place of Worship**

Floor Area m2

0.005

0.005

 

12.6

Community Building / Hall / Library**

Floor Area m2

0.005

0.005

See Clause 6. Notes & Definitions

12.7

Parks / Gardens / Reserves (Irrigation)

-

To be considered on a case by case basis

12.8

Public Amenities (per shower)

Shower

0.40

0.40963

 

12.9

Public Amenities (per WC or Urinal)

WC

or Urinal

0.40

0.40963

The equivalent width of one urinal equals 600mm

Industrial User Categories  -  Standard ET Figures

13.0

Industrial General

13.1

Light Industrial

Gross Ha

15.00

15.00

Gross Ha includes Road Area

(i.e. Length of parcel road frontage x ½ road reserve width)

13.2

Light Industrial**

Floor Area m2

0.003

0.003

For mixed use sites

13.3

Future Unknown - Light

Gross Ha

15.00

15.00

Gross Ha includes Road Area as per comments at 13.1

13.4

Future Unknown - Medium

Gross Ha

30.00

30.00

Gross Ha includes Road Area as per comments at 13.1

13.5

Future Unknown - Heavy

Gross Ha

50.00

50.00

Gross Ha includes Road Area as per comments at 13.1

 

** Rate set by Local Precedence

 

 

Notes

a.

One (1) Local ET = Town Water Usage of 630 L/day & Sewerage Loading of 590 L/day

b.

A “bedroom” is any habitable room that, in the opinion of Council, by its physical design, designated or capable of being used as a bedroom including separably accessible rooms designated a bedroo